Law sale lowest of Innocence (A Lincoln Lawyer Novel, 6) outlet sale

Law sale lowest of Innocence (A Lincoln Lawyer Novel, 6) outlet sale

Law sale lowest of Innocence (A Lincoln Lawyer Novel, 6) outlet sale

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Lincoln Lawyer Mickey Haller is back on the job in this heart-stopping thriller from a renowned #1 New York Times bestselling author.

“One of the finest legal thrillers of the last decade” —Associated Press


On the night he celebrates a big win, defense attorney Mickey Haller is pulled over by police, who find the body of a former client in the trunk of his Lincoln. Haller is immediately charged with murder but can’t post the exorbitant $5 million bail slapped on him by a vindictive judge.
 
Mickey elects to represent himself and is forced to mount his defense from his jail cell in the Twin Towers Correctional Center in downtown Los Angeles. All the while he needs to look over his shoulder—as an officer of the court he is an instant target, and he makes few friends when he reveals a corruption plot within the jail.
 
But the bigger plot is the one against him. Haller knows he’s been framed, whether by a new enemy or an old one. As his trusted team, including his half-brother, Harry Bosch, investigates, Haller must use all his skills in the courtroom to counter the damning evidence against him.
 
Even if he can obtain a not-guilty verdict, Mickey understands that it won’t be enough. In order to be truly exonerated, he must find out who really committed the murder and why. That is the law of innocence.
 
In his highest stakes case yet, the Lincoln Lawyer fights for his life and proves again why he is “a worthy colleague of Atticus Finch . . . in the front of the pack in the legal thriller game” ( Los Angeles Times).

A CBS The Doctors Book Club Pick
People Book of the Week Selection

Amazon.com Review

In The Law of Innocence, Michael Connelly brilliantly captures the desperation of a lawyer-turned-defendant facing a long stretch in a prison full of people with scores to settle. Narration in the first person, showing a canny legal mind working furiously to hit on the right legal play, calibrates the suspense to an unbearable, read-in-one-sitting level. —Vannessa Cronin, Amazon Book Review

Review

“The so-called Lincoln Lawyer... turns in another dazzling courtroom performance."― Marilyn Stasio, New York Times Book Review

“If you’re not already addicted to Mickey, his ex-wives and his brilliant half brother, investigator Harry Bosch, this perfectly constructed legal thriller will get you there.”― People (Book of the Week)

“One of the finest legal thrillers of the last decade… Connelly’s novels have long been distinguished by his mastery of the complexities of the justice system including an ability to get police and courtroom procedures exactly right.”― Bruce DeSilva, Associated Press

“A wonderfully twisty legal thriller… As always, Connelly does a splendid job with both the courtroom drama and the suspenseful, often dangerous process behind it.”― Colette Bancroft, Tampa Bay Times

“Stellar… the action never lags... The Law of Innocence again proves Connelly is a master storyteller.”― Oline H. Cogdill, South Florida Sun Sentinel

“Gripping… Fans are in for another treat from the blockbuster author.”― Christina Ianzito, AARP

"A tightly crafted thriller, with some nice crossover flair to boot (fans of Harry Bosch always enjoy seeing him show up in new places)."― Dwyer Murphy, Crimereads

"A fine legal thriller and a revealing character study.”― Bill Ott, Booklist (starred review)

“Superlative... A supremely intelligent, well-paced courtroom thriller by a modern master.” ― Publisher''s Weekly (starred review)

About the Author

Michael Connelly is the author of thirty-four previous novels, including the New York Times bestsellers, Fair Warning, The Night Fire, and Dark Sacred Night. His books, which include the Harry Bosch series, the Lincoln Lawyer series, and the Renée Ballard series, have sold more than eighty million copies worldwide. Connelly is a former newspaper reporter who has won numerous awards for his journalism and his novels. He is the executive producer of Bosch, starring Titus Welliver, and the creator and host of the podcast Murder Book. He spends his time in California and Florida.

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4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
33,458 global ratings

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Top reviews from the United States

J. Denny
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The author blatantly introduced his personal politics.
Reviewed in the United States on November 13, 2020
I have read all of the Bosch and Haller novels, I have thoroughly enjoyed them all until this one, but I will read no more of them should there be any. About 2/3rds through this novel, the author introduced a real-life, very prominent current-day political figure – by name... See more
I have read all of the Bosch and Haller novels, I have thoroughly enjoyed them all until this one, but I will read no more of them should there be any. About 2/3rds through this novel, the author introduced a real-life, very prominent current-day political figure – by name - into a jury selection scene.

The author used highly defamatory descriptions of this politician’s character to justify the novel’s leading character’s striking potential jurors. The irony of the author’s using this politician (or any living real-life person) in this way is that the novel’s plucky main character was on trial for murder, and the dishonest prosecution was continually making it difficult for the defendant to defend himself – just as the author’s use of a novel as a vehicle for defamation purposes has precluded this current-day politician from defending himself. It is disgusting, cowardly, and very disappointing.
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Wanda M. Keith Rn
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
VERY DISAPPOINTED
Reviewed in the United States on November 12, 2020
I have been a fan of Connelly since day one and own every book and have watched every ''Bosch'' show. I am an avid reader with over 100 books per year; fiction and non-fiction. Connelly has always been my favorite fiction and I look forward anxiously for each book. I was... See more
I have been a fan of Connelly since day one and own every book and have watched every ''Bosch'' show. I am an avid reader with over 100 books per year; fiction and non-fiction. Connelly has always been my favorite fiction and I look forward anxiously for each book. I was doing well with this book until I got to the part where Micky turned political and insulted at least half of the readers of this book. When I want to read a book on politics then that is what I pick up. When I want to escape from politics and the problems of the world then I pick up fiction and find myself often re-reading Connelly. I used to watch sports to escape, as well, but no longer do so because they have turned political. How sad that my favorite writer of fiction and one of my favorite characters decided to insult me and turn my reading experience into a political statement. As for the book, it was ok. Not one of Connelly''s best
For any liberals reading this post who feel the need to attack me for stating my views, don''t bother. You have called me names and tried to shame me for over four years so I am used to anything you have to throw at me now.
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L.M. KeeferTop Contributor: Cooking
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Lincoln Lawyer Introduces Politics
Reviewed in the United States on November 23, 2020
When Lincoln Lawyer Mickey Haller is selecting a jury who will decide if he''s guilty of murder or innocent, Haller discovers one woman on the jury has a Trump sticker on her car. Haller reasons that Trump lies, so the Trump supporter lacks a framework of integrity. The... See more
When Lincoln Lawyer Mickey Haller is selecting a jury who will decide if he''s guilty of murder or innocent, Haller discovers one woman on the jury has a Trump sticker on her car. Haller reasons that Trump lies, so the Trump supporter lacks a framework of integrity. The juror is rejected.

I don''t like negative politics introduced in my favorite fiction I read. I read to escape the negativity in the political world. I don''t like it when supporters of a political candidate are singled out as being dishonest or stupid for voting for a specific candidate. That can be perceived as being divisive and insulting to readers.

I enjoyed the legal strategy in this book, just not the negative politics.
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SCDC
1.0 out of 5 stars
Michael Connelly Totalled His Lincoln and His Career
Reviewed in the United States on November 10, 2020
Michael Connelly recently came onto my radar. I raced through his books to be able to read this book when it came out today. WHAT A JOKE! This is THE worst book that Connelly has written by FAR. Here’s why: 1) it’s a mystery and we don’t know who did... See more
Michael Connelly recently came onto my radar. I raced through his books to be able to read this book when it came out today.

WHAT A JOKE! This is THE worst book that Connelly has written by FAR. Here’s why:

1) it’s a mystery and we don’t know who did it. Enough said.
2) Nothing Haller and his “team” did made any difference in the case. All their moves led nowhere.
3) The book ends with a heavy dose of “lawyering” and none of it is particularly clever and leads to nothing. The case is dismissed with a whimper!?!
4) Ok. This is a minor gripe, but Connelly has gotten more and more political with his recent books. This one is over the top. I realize that the publisher may be pushing this nonsense, but you would think Connelly has the gravitas to veto such blatant bias. So he is weak or he actually believes that insulting half the country is a good strategy to sell books.
5) Why was Harry Bosch even in this book? He solves crimes from 30 years ago, but just investigates around the edges when his brother is clearly framed. He’s portrayed as an impotent hanger on... Harry Bosch!?!
6) SPOILER ALERT: So many unanswered questions: Was the police officer that pulled Haller over in on it? Who knows? Why did the FBI step in at the last minute, when they could have avoided the publicity of the trial at the beginning? Why did the DA have such animosity? Seriously? What made her so confident? No gun... Haller has three cars, but chooses to drive around knowing he has a body in the trunk? He killed someone for a chance at getting $100K? Seriously? That’s a pretty thin motive.

This book is complete garbage. I can’t believe I was so excited to read it.

I’m done with The Lincoln Lawyer and since this series has turned into a platform to espouse political beliefs, I’m done with Connelly.

Like so many great artists, he appears to have gotten bored with the very thing that made him successful. Whatever this is, it isn’t close to Michael Connelly at his best (20 years ago.)
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Kindle Customer
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Disappointing, fragmented and draggy.
Reviewed in the United States on November 12, 2020
This was a new book about the ongoing Lincoln Lawyer. I enjoyed the movie, and ordered all the books. This one was fairly good, not a show stopper, but adequate entertainment...UNTIL, page 265. " if number 68 was a supporter of the president (I had to put the lower case in.... See more
This was a new book about the ongoing Lincoln Lawyer. I enjoyed the movie, and ordered all the books. This one was fairly good, not a show stopper, but adequate entertainment...UNTIL, page 265. " if number 68 was a supporter of the president (I had to put the lower case in. Apparently, the author didn''t see fit to capitalize the title) it would lalala...not giving away the whole paragraph...my point is THIS NEXT: It was blind loyalty to a cause, and an indicator that truthfulness was not an important part of her framework. " BS!!! The author just lost a "constant reader", as another well known liberal author finally lost me, too. Write a good book and leave your politics at Chapter One!
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ColoReader
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Haller gets arrested, Connelly gets political (spoilers)
Reviewed in the United States on November 11, 2020
I have read and watched many interviews with Michael Connelly over the years. I even talked with him briefly at a book signing years ago. I''ve read every novel he''s ever written, most of them multiple times. This is the first time I''ve been left feeling... See more
I have read and watched many interviews with Michael Connelly over the years. I even talked with him briefly at a book signing years ago. I''ve read every novel he''s ever written, most of them multiple times. This is the first time I''ve been left feeling disappointed.

First things first: Connelly''s politics are on display in this story. Even if you agree with his position, his commentary is this book may offend you. First, he accuses Trump of things that EVERY politician in history has done. Second, he includes the pandemic in the story, but it is not germaine to the plot -- it''s simply a mechanism for Connelly to spout his political viewpoint.

On to the story (SPOILERS HERE). The first third to half of the novel follows Haller''s stay in jail awaiting trial, and his eventually successful efforts to get released on bail. The plot then lurches clumsily to the trial phase, skipping several weeks of what we must assume were efforts to find the real killer. Not only that, but Bosch''s participation in the investigation seems almost like an afterthought. I wonder if Bosch was actually a completely different character during the first draft, and Connelly decided that Bosch needed to make an appearance. Bosch''s inclusion in the plot is minor, and not very compelling.

The prosecutor is a thinly developed character as well. Her motivations were never made clear, and MC makes no effort to explain her refusal to accept Haller''s apparent innocence at the end of the story, even though all other characters are on board with that conclusion. The prosecutor seems to have been made a villain simply because the story didn''t really have any other potential villains. Even the "real" killer is not exactly a villain -- more a peripheral character.

Lastly, the final scene with the would-be assassin seems very forced, as if Connelly was told by his editor that the book needed SOME sort of excitement, so Connelly added a couple pages of a contrived "shootout" at the end.

I could go on and on.....the Kendall character was completely unnecessary. The bus attack on Haller was not necessary, and was never explained either. The Milton sub-plot was never resolved. Etc etc.

This was a very disappointing effort. I really looked forward to this novel, but now I''m sorry I read it. And I will be very wary of MC in the future, considering that he is now a political commentator.
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Ramdslpwr
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
What happened to the real Lincoln lawyer?
Reviewed in the United States on November 12, 2020
Horribly poor plot and no answers to most questions. This seriously reads like a poor copy cat author that tried to lump all Mconnellys characters in a book but failed to capture any of their real personalities in the story. Bosch is simply a bumbling byline that never does... See more
Horribly poor plot and no answers to most questions. This seriously reads like a poor copy cat author that tried to lump all Mconnellys characters in a book but failed to capture any of their real personalities in the story. Bosch is simply a bumbling byline that never does anything productive while the rest of the case characters fail to really answer any of the questions raised by the story. Then to top it all off attempting to insert the current Covid flu into it makes for a weird fragmented item. It feels like the author felt the need to insert a few random unrelated facts into the story for no reason but to muddy the waters. Like inserting someone’s choice of breakfast cereal into a story about werewolves. Lastly the pathetic attempts to score political points by a few digs at Trump, Fox News, and Trump supporters was so pathetic and childish it made me laugh. Really? You’re a best selling author and you feel the need to insert current political opinions into a rag tag story in an attempt to make it relevant?? I’ve read every single Bosch and Lincoln Lawyer book so far. After this let down I’m not sure I’ll spend the money again.
It like a redneck and a BLM protester attempted to write a book.
Bottom line, rushed, pathetic plot, no real answers, and cheap political shots.
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Teri
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Why, did you have to bring in politics???
Reviewed in the United States on November 15, 2020
In the midst of a pandemic, reading is an escape, but Michael Connolly just had to a infect this latest book with his hatred of President Trump and his derision for the “true believers” that support him. Apparently believing it is perfectly fine to insult and disparage... See more
In the midst of a pandemic, reading is an escape, but Michael Connolly just had to a infect this latest book with his hatred of President Trump and his derision for the “true believers” that support him. Apparently believing it is perfectly fine to insult and disparage 70,000,00+ million Americans. Well, I won’t forget.
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Top reviews from other countries

Chester Studzinski
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
More than five stars needed for this masterpiece
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 16, 2020
What can I say. This is a masterpiece from The Master. I started reading Michael Connelly''s books back in 2012 after a friend recommended Lincoln Lawyer as a good read. I think this amazing story is probably number 40 or thereabouts and I have to say that it is the best...See more
What can I say. This is a masterpiece from The Master. I started reading Michael Connelly''s books back in 2012 after a friend recommended Lincoln Lawyer as a good read. I think this amazing story is probably number 40 or thereabouts and I have to say that it is the best yet. It was like a good meal which I deliberately savoured over about 5 wonderful courses, each accompanied by a beautiful glass of wine. Because I enjoyed it so much, I am leaving a big tip which is "READ THIS BOOK- IT IS AMAZING"
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James Brydon
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Another fine legal thriller from Michael Connelly, at the top of his game
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 7, 2020
I am amazed at how prolific a writer Michael Connelly is. This is the second novel he has published during 2020, and he had produced at least one book a year for the last twenty years or so. What is more, that productivity is not achieved at the cost of quality; this latest...See more
I am amazed at how prolific a writer Michael Connelly is. This is the second novel he has published during 2020, and he had produced at least one book a year for the last twenty years or so. What is more, that productivity is not achieved at the cost of quality; this latest offering is up to his customary high standard. Connelly is best known for his long series of books featuring Hieronymus ‘Harry’ Bosch. Formerly a long-serving detective in LAPD, and more recently retired, and acting as a private investigator. Connelly went out of his way to ensure that Bosch aged in real time, and while that helped with the books’ sense of authenticity, it meant that he had to make hard decisions about when, and how, Bosch would step down from the police force. Connelly has also written a second, related series of novels featuring Mickey Haller, known as the ‘Lincoln Lawyer’ because for a long time he worked from the back of his chauffeur driven Town Car, rather than from a formal office. However, it gradually emerges that Haller is actually Bosch’s half-brother, and in recent years they have often worked on the same case. It is not a frictionless relationship. For one thing, Bosch’s upbringing was significantly harder than that of Haller, involving care home and intervention by social services. Bosch had also been a cop for almost all his working life, and as such had formed an intrinsic dislike (and distrust) of defence lawyers, whom he dismissed as frequently subverting, rather than upholding, justice. Over the years, however, they have established an accommodation. As the novel opens, we learn that Haller himself is in prison, on remand and awaiting trial for murder after the body of one of his former clients was found in the boot of his car. The case appears fairly strong, and the District Attorney’s Office is pursuing their investigations zealously, feeling extra savour in the thought of perhaps convicting someone who over the years had proved such a thorn in their side. Haller has marshalled his own team, and is working vigorously on his defence from his prison cell, but knows that he is embarking on the most important case of his career. Connelly has a fine style for crime writing. He develops his plots clearly, and the reader invariably finds themselves engrossed in the story virtually from the opening page. His characters, from either side of the law, are highly plausible, as are his plots. He never relies on spurious or contrived coincidences. Connelly began his professional life as a crime reporter, which presumably is where he perfected his sharp prose style. His writing is direct and clear. For the last few years, I have worked in the Civil Service, drafting correspondence for government ministers, and the mantra that my colleagues and I frequently cite is for the ABC of good drafting: accuracy, brevity and clarity. Michael Connelly delivers on all three counts.
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Maybe his best?
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 11, 2020
When Mickey Haller is arrested for a murder he didn’t commit, he decides to defend himself with a little help from his friends. And off we go on one of the best courtroom dramas I have ever read. Michael Connelly at his very best.
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W. J. Macgregor
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
It''s an O.K. story, not a great story
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 25, 2020
I like these stories as an occasional diversion from the Bosch series, as they are generally well written and researched. I have read a couple of these stories in the past and they have been on the whole a reasonable holiday read, with a possible TV movie script in them,...See more
I like these stories as an occasional diversion from the Bosch series, as they are generally well written and researched. I have read a couple of these stories in the past and they have been on the whole a reasonable holiday read, with a possible TV movie script in them, this one was different. It left me with the question Why? It started off fine enough, but I lost patience and some measure of credibility with the procedural stuff not jibing at all about half way through, with the sinister FBI agents and the outrageous zealot of a prosecutor being the bad guys, left me wondering how this story had ended up in print. Does this novel move the Mickey Haller story along? Yes it does a bit. Is his character trading on past glories? Yes that too. The ending scene itself is dramatic enough for television but led me to question the whole storyline. Perhaps the next offering with have a better story line that passes the credibility threshold by some margin rather than the lip service this one pays it. Come back Bosch, please....
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Helena Handcart
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Written by the B team
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 1, 2020
If, like me, you''ve read all the Michael Connelly crime novels, you may well have reached the conclusion, like me, that they''re not all written by the same person. Some, like the McEvoys or the Ballards, have great plotting and pace; others are clunky and turgid (like the...See more
If, like me, you''ve read all the Michael Connelly crime novels, you may well have reached the conclusion, like me, that they''re not all written by the same person. Some, like the McEvoys or the Ballards, have great plotting and pace; others are clunky and turgid (like the McCalebs) or just banal (Void Moon, I''m looking at you). The Bosch novels are generally good, the Haller ones a bit of a mixed bag. And this one? Well, this one sucks, to be honest. Whichever minion at Hieronymus Inc. churned it out should (a) be ashamed of themselves, (b) go back to writing Harlequin romances, and (c) read more widely to try and figure out what we mean when we say ''show, don''t tell''. Unless - also like me - you''re a completist by temperament, I would save yourself twenty quid and wait for the next one, which will undoubtedly be along soon and hopefully be written by somebody else.
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Law sale lowest of Innocence (A Lincoln Lawyer Novel, 6) outlet sale

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